Note to readers: Liturgical entries on this blog are based on the traditional calendar of the Books of Common Prayer and the traditional one-year Eucharistic lectionary. If you follow a newer calendar or three-year lectionary, there are variations in names for some Sundays and in the readings.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Easter Even

Holy Saturday known in the Prayer Book tradition as Easter Even has always been a low-key day liturgically. It has been a day of rest in commemoration of Christ's time in the tomb and a day of preparation for Easter celebration. From the second century onwards the evening of this Saturday became a vigil of prayers and readings. The rite of kindling new fire, baptizing catechumens, and celebrating the first Eucharist were added after midnight. In 1549, Cranmer simplified matters and eliminated most of the speccial features of Holy Saturday and the Great Vigil. He did retain a Psalm, Epistle and Gospel. The Palm Sunday Collect was expected to be used, and some baptisms were administered. In 1637, the Scottish Book of Common Prayer added a proper collect for Easter Even, possibly prepared by Bishop Cosin. The 1662 BCP included this collect which connects Holy Week-Easter themes with baptism.

Grant, O Lord, that as we are baptized into the death of thy blessed Son, our Saviour Jesus Christ, so by continual mortifying our corrupt affections we may be buried with him; and that through the grave, and gate of death, we may pass to our joyful resurrection; for his merits, who died, and was buried, and rose again for us, the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Friday, March 30, 2018

Good Friday

By thine Agony and Bloody Sweat; by thy Cross and Passion; by thy precious Death and Burial; by thy glorious Resurrection and Ascension, and by the Coming of the Holy Ghost,
Good Lord, deliver us.
In all time of our tribulation; in all time of our prosperity; in the hour of death, and in the day of judgment,
Good Lord, deliver us. (1928 BCP, The Litany, p. 55)


But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world. (Galatians 6:14, KJV)

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Thursday before Easter, commonly called Maundy Thursday

Although Christians often speculate about various meanings of the Lord's Supper, the basics are beautifully stated in the following two collects.

Almighty Father, whose dear Son, on the night before he suffered, did institute the Sacrament of his Body and Blood; Mercifully grant that we may thankfully receive the same in remembrance of him, who in these holy mysteries giveth us a pledge of life eternal; the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who now liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit ever, one God, world without end. Amen. (1928 BCP, p.152)

Grant, O Father, that when we receive the blessed Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Christ, coming to those holy mysteries in faith, and love, and true repentance, we may receive remission of our sins, and be filled with thy grace and heavenly benediction; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (1928 BCP, Offices of Instruction, p. 295)

Thanks be to God for this great and holy gift!

Friday, March 23, 2018

Anglican Stations of the Cross?

During Lent, we often hear of Stations of the Cross- an extra-liturgical way of meditation on the events culminating in Christ's death and burial. The roots of this devotion probably go back to the fourth century AD when Christian pilgrims could appear openly in the streets of Jerusalem during Holy Week. Eventually some of these devotions were carried to other parts of the Christian world, and in the Middle Ages, the Way of the Cross was promoted especially by the Franciscans. Eventually in late medieval and Renaissance Roman Catholicism, the number of stations was set at fourteen. Unfortunately, some of the fourteen traditional stations ( for example, how many times Jesus may have fallen or the existence of Veronica) have little or no Scriptural basis; they seem rather to be products of human imagination. Furthermore, some Anglicans and others have had difficulties with the Roman Catholic emphasis on  the "Hail, Mary." So simplified forms of meditation have been developed.

Since this is an extra-liturgical devotion, we may adapt it for local use. Some Anglicans and Protestants prefer to use only eight Stations of the Cross, since those are some of the main events recorded in the Gospel accounts. Station 1: Pilate Condemns Jesus to Die (John 19:16; Matt. 27:26; Mark 15:15), Station 2: Jesus Accepts His Cross (John 19:17), Station 3: Simon Helps Carry the Cross (Matt. 27:32; Mark 15:21),  Station 4: Jesus Speaks to the Women (Luke 23:27-28), Station 5: Jesus Is Stripped of His Garments (Mark 15:24), Station 6: Jesus Is Nailed to the Cross (Mark 15:25), Station 7: Jesus Cares for His Mother (John 19:26-27), Station 8: Jesus Dies on the Cross (Mark 15:37; John 19:30).  One could easily add other Scriptural events such as the scourging of Jesus and His burial to have ten stations.

The devotion could begin with a Scripture sentence or invocation of the Trinity, a collect from Lent or Good Friday, the Lord's Prayer and the Apostles' Creed. Stations could be simple stopping places in a church, parish hall or church yard, or there could be places marked by a cross and/or illustration. At each station, there could be appropriate Scripture verses, a time for silence and one or more prayer. The orthodox Jesus Prayer or the Kyrie might be a good conclusion of each station. One appropriate prayer to use is the Collect for the Monday before Easter from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer: Almighty God, whose most dear Son went not up to joy but first he suffered pain, and entered not into glory before he was crucified; Mercifully grant that we, walking in the way of the cross, may find it none other than the way of life and peace; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

After the last station the leader might conclude with the Grace from I Corinthians 13:14